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In the Name of the Father: Washington's Legacy, Slavery, and the Making of a Nation Reprint Edition
Contributor(s): Furstenberg, Francois
ISBN: 0143111930     ISBN-13: 9780143111931
Publisher: Penguin Group USA
    OUR PRICE: $16.20  
Product Type: Paperback - Other Formats
Published: April 2007
Qty:
Annotation: Furstenberg offers a revelatory study of how Americans were bound together as a young nation by the words, the image, and the myth of George Washington, and how slavery shaped American nationalism.
Additional Information
BISAC Categories:
- History | United States | Revolutionary Period (1775-1800)
- History | United States | 19th Century
Dewey: 973
Academic/Grade Level: General Adult
Book type: Non-Fiction
Physical Information: 8.25" H x 5.25" W x 0.75" (0.70 lbs) 335 pages
 
Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.
Publisher Description:
In this revelatory and genuinely groundbreaking study, Franois Furstenberg sheds new light on the genesis of American identity. Immersing us in the publishing culture of the early nineteenth century, he shows us how the words of George Washington and others of his generation became Americas sacred scripture and provided the foundation for a new civic cultureone whose reconciliation with slavery unleashed consequences that haunt us still. A dazzling work of scholarship from a brilliant young historian, "In the Name of the Father" is a major contribution to American social history.

Contributor Bio(s): François Furstenberg was born in Washington, D.C., and grew up in Boston, Massachusetts, and Washington. After graduating with a BA from Columbia University, he worked for several years in Paris before pursuing his graduate studies in history at The Johns Hopkins University, where he earned his Ph.D. in 2003. He was a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in U.S. history at Cambridge University, England, for one year, after which he moved to Montreal, Canada, where he is an assistant professor of history at the Université de Montréal.François Furstenberg was born in Washington, D.C., and grew up in Boston, Massachusetts, and Washington. After graduating with a BA from Columbia University, he worked for several years in Paris before pursuing his graduate studies in history at The Johns Hopkins University, where he earned his Ph.D. in 2003. He was a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in U.S. history at Cambridge University, England, for one year, after which he moved to Montreal, Canada, where he is an assistant professor of history at the Université de Montréal.

Reviewed by Publishers Weekly Reviews (PW Reviews 2006 May #1)

How were the ideals that were articulated in America's founding documents--freedom, democracy and government based on the consent of the governed--disseminated to the nation? That question animates this extraordinary new study by Furstenberg, an assistant professor of history at the Université de Montréal, which shows how popular print--broadsides, newspaper columns, schoolbooks, sermons--taught citizens "liberal and republican values," and ultimately "create[d] a nation." Thus Furstenberg devotes a chapter to Mason Weems's bestselling early biography of Washington: in addition to originating the famous cheery tree story, Weems taught a generation of Americans subtle stories about nationalism, virtue and piety. Indeed, Washington--or, rather, images of Washington--became central to American political education. In reading Washington's farewell address aloud to the family when it was reprinted, year after year, in the local newspaper, or in hanging his portrait on the dining room wall, Americans were expressing their consent to be governed by the government Washington presided over. In the deluge of founding father books, Furstenberg's blend of high-brow intellectual history and popular culture studies stands out; rather than lionize Washington, it advances an important argument about his role in shaping American political identity. B&w illus. (June 26)

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