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The Marbury Lens
Contributor(s): Smith, Andrew
ISBN: 0312613423     ISBN-13: 9780312613426
Publisher: Feiwel & Friends
    OUR PRICE: $16.19  
Product Type: School And Library - Other Formats
Published: November 2010
Qty:
Annotation: After barely escaping an attempted kidnapping, Jack goes to London with his best friend Conner, where someone gives him a pair of glasses that send him to an alternate universe where war is raging.
Additional Information
Library of Congress Subjects:
Emotional problems; Fiction.
Kidnapping; Fiction.
Survival; Fiction.
Dewey: [Fic]
LCCN: 2010013007
Lexile Measure: 720
Academic/Grade Level: Grade 7-9, Age 12-14
Book type: Juvenile Fiction
Physical Information: 8.75" H x 5.75" W x 1.25" (1.04 lbs) 358 pages
Accelerated Reader Info
Quiz #: 141077
Reading Level: 4.4   Interest Level: Upper Grades   Point Value: 14.0
Scholastic Reading Counts Info
Quiz #: Q52474
Reading Level: 5.4   Interest Level: Grades 9-12   Point Value: 22.0
 
Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.

Contributor Bio(s): IV>
Andrew Smith is the author of Ghost Medicine, named an American Library Association Best Book for Young Adults, and In the Path of Falling Objects. In addition to writing, he teaches high school advanced placement classes and coaches rugby. He lives in Southern California with his family, in a rural location in the mountains.


Reviewed by Horn Book Guide Reviews (Horn Book Guide Reviews 2011 Spring)
While visiting London, Jack Whitmore discovers a pair of glasses that transport him to the apocalyptic world of Marbury. There he finds himself struggling to protect two younger boys. Meanwhile, his loose grip on reality threatens his relationships with his best friend and with a new love interest. Complex characters and visceral details make for a haunting and intriguing journey. Copyright 2010 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

Reviewed by Publishers Weekly Reviews (PW Reviews 2010 October #4)

In this brutal but highly effective dark fantasy, Smith (In the Path of Falling Objects) tells the story of 16-year-old Jack, who gets drunk at a party and is kidnapped, tortured, and nearly raped by a serial killer. Jack escapes, but when he and his best friend Conner run into the kidnapper the next day, they abduct him in turn and accidentally kill him. Jack is highly traumatized by the experience and refuses to go to police, in part because he and Conner are leaving for England to check out a prep school. When Jack arrives in London, he is accosted by a mysterious stranger who seems to know him and hands him an odd pair of glasses. Looking through them, Jack is transported to the horrendous, postapocalyptic world of Marbury, where he is responsible for two younger boys, and Conner has been transformed into a murderous mutant, further destabilizing Jack's precarious sanity. This bloody and genuinely upsetting book packs an enormous emotional punch. Smith's characters are very well developed and the ruined alternate universe they travel through is both surreal and believable. Ages 14–up. (Nov.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2010 PWxyz LLC

Reviewed by School Library Journal Reviews (SLJ Reviews 2011 January)

Gr 10 Up—What better way to celebrate an adventure to London than with a going-away party? Sounds good until Jack gets drunk and finds himself at the mercy of a crazed stranger who drugs him and holds him hostage. Readers will cheer when Jack frees himself from the certain death that seems to await him at his captor's home. But once he's out of harm's way, readers—like Jack—will begin to think being chained to the bed of a stranger was so much simpler than being on the run from a murder rap and hearing voices in his head. It all gets worse when he finds himself in London looking through some purple-tinted glasses into a parallel world of cannibalism and gore. As Jack grapples with maintaining his sanity, he also struggles with the fact that his best friend and traveling companion, Conner, is a murderous monster in the parallel world of Marbury—a murderous monster that he must face. This title will keep readers enthralled with its well-developed characters and unique plot. The four-letter words come fast and furiously, but they're no stronger than the violent and gruesome situations that befall Jack and Conner. Smith spares no graphic details to depict the horrific world of Marbury. The novel is not an easy read, but it is one that will keep teens hooked and the author leaves plenty of unresolved threads for a possible sequel.—Robbie L. Flowers, Detroit Public Library, MI

[Page 115]. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.