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Brisingr: Or the Seven Promises of Eragon Shadeslayer and Saphira Bjartskular Reprint Edition
Contributor(s): Paolini, Christopher
ISBN: 0375826742     ISBN-13: 9780375826740
Publisher: Alfred a Knopf Inc
    OUR PRICE: $13.49  
Product Type: Paperback - Other Formats
Published: April 2010
Qty:
Annotation: With the battle against the Emperor's warriors over, Eragon must remain true to his oath to save his cousin's love, Katrina, from the hands of King Galbatorix, but when the Varden makes a desperate plea for his help at the same time, Eragon must make a challenging decision that could affect the lives of many in the Empire and beyond. Reprint.
Additional Information
Library of Congress Subjects:
Fantasy.
Dragons; Fiction.
Dewey: [Fic]
LCCN: bl2010009757
Lexile Measure: 1050
Academic/Grade Level: Grade 7-9, Age 12-14
Series: Inheritance Cycle
Book type: Juvenile Fiction
Physical Information: 7.75" H x 5.25" W x 1.75" (1.40 lbs) 763 pages
Accelerated Reader Info
Quiz #: 125940
Reading Level: 7.8   Interest Level: Upper Grades   Point Value: 45.0
Scholastic Reading Counts Info
Quiz #: Q45282
Reading Level: 7.7   Interest Level: Grades 6-8   Point Value: 54.0
 
Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.

Contributor Bio(s): ristopher Paolini's abiding love of fantasy inspired him to write the Inheritance cycle, which quickly became an internationally bestselling series. Christopher draws inspiration for the world of Eragon and his dragon, Saphira, from the natural beauty that surrounds his home in Montana: the tumultuous weather, the rushing Yellowstone River, and the soaring Beartooth Mountains.

Christopher is currently writing the final book in the Inheritance cycle, which will conclude the story he first imagined over a decade ago. Find out more about Christopher, Brisingr, and the Inheritance cycle at Alagaesia.com.

Reviewed by Horn Book Guide Reviews (Horn Book Guide Reviews 2009 Spring)
Eragon and his dragon, Saphira, continue their quest to defeat tyrant magician Galbatorix. Paolini's enthusiasm and transparent love of his own story keep the proceedings (700-plus pages packed with extraneous scenes and dialogue) from bogging down completely. Readers who share his delight will enjoy the full-sense immersion in his world, though even they might cavil at the lightweight climax. Copyright 2009 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

Reviewed by Horn Book Guide Reviews (Horn Book Guide Reviews 2004 Spring)
This lengthy first novel borrows heavily from its fantasy predecessors but never hatches an original idea. Fifteen-year-old Eragon joins a war against the Empire and journeys across Alagadsia after finding and bonding with a dragon. The endless journeying becomes tedious, dialogue too often substitutes for action, and the shopworn story line lacks narrative drive. Copyright 2004 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

Reviewed by Horn Book Magazine Reviews (Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2009 #1)
Eragon the Dragon Rider and his dragon Saphira continue their quest to defeat the tyrant magician Galbatorix, who enslaved a human empire and threatens the elf and dwarf sovereignties of Alagaesia. So entranced is author Paolini with his creation, however, that Book Three spilled into two volumes, this first of which is episodic rather than plot-driven: a daring rescue of his cousin Roran's betrothed; a skirmish against Galbatorix's dragon-rider team Murtagh (Eragon's half-brother) and Thorn; ally Orik's ascension to the kingship of the dwarves; and the forging of Eragon's new sword Brisingr. At the end, Eragon bids farewell to his mentor and mentor dragon, who have joined the resistance. Ironically, the author's self-indulgence may also be his saving grace: if the book's 700-plus pages are packed with extraneous scenes and dialogue, Paolini's enthusiasm and transparent love of his own story keep the proceedings from bogging down completely, and readers who share his delight will enjoy the full-sense immersion in his world. Even they might cavil at the lightweight climax, but Paolini promises that the fourth and final projected volume is "going to be the most exciting installment in the series" -- hopeful words indeed. Copyright 2009 Horn Book Magazine Reviews.

Reviewed by Publishers Weekly Reviews (PW Reviews 2005 April #1)
While exploring the forest, 15-year-old Eragon discovers an odd blue gemstone-a dragon egg, fated to hatch in his care. According to PW, "The author takes the near-archetypes of fantasy fiction and makes them fresh and enjoyable, chiefly through a crisp narrative and a likable hero." Ages 12-up. (Apr.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

Reviewed by Publishers Weekly Reviews (PW Reviews 2004 August #4)
Makeovers with Mass AppealNew editions spruce up popular titles and bestselling series. Christopher Paolini's Eragon is now available in a deluxe edition, which includes an extensive language/pronunciation guide, a foldout map of Alaga‰sia in blue ink (penned by Paolini) and new artwork by the author. (Aug.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Reviewed by Publishers Weekly Reviews (PW Reviews 2003 July #3)
In the first volume in Paolini's planned Inheritance trilogy, 15-year-old Eragon discovers an odd blue gemstone while exploring an infamous stretch of forest. It is a dragon egg, fated to hatch in his care. Eragon quickly develops a psychic connection with the female dragon that emerges, whom he names Saphira ("His emotions were completely open to her mind, and she understood him better than anyone else"). Eragon narrowly escapes doom with Saphira's help, but the uncle who raised him is killed, setting up a robust revenge/adventure tale. The scope quickly expands: Eragon turns out to be the first of a new generation of Riders, a lodge of legendary dragon-riding warriors killed by the evil King Galbatorix. As a result, he becomes the focal point in a war between Galbatorix's forces and the resistance efforts of the Varden. Paolini, who was 15 years old himself when he began this book, takes the near-archetypes of fantasy fiction and makes them fresh and enjoyable, chiefly through a crisp narrative and a likable hero. He carries a substantial Tolkien influence-fanciful spellings of geographical names, the use of landscape as character, as well as the scale and structure of the story itself. But his use of language dispenses with the floral, pastoral touch in favor of more direct prose. The likeness does not end there: the volume opens with a detailed map of Paolini's world, and ends with a glossary and pronunciation guide for his invented language. An auspicious beginning to both career and series. Ages 12-up. (Aug.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

Reviewed by PW Annex Reviews (Publishers Weekly Annex Reviews)
The much-anticipated third book in Paolini's Inheritance Cycle continues to rely heavily on classic fantasy tropes. The novel launches with magician and Dragon Rider Eragon, his cousin Roran and the dragon Saphira on a quest to rescue Roran's betrothed. The cousins soon split up, and Roran undergoes his own series of heroic tests, culminating in a well-choreographed and intense fight against an Urgal (a ram-human hybrid). Eragon, at the same time, encounters treacherous dwarves, undergoes even more training with the elf Oromis and gains a magical sword suitable for a Dragon Rider. The silly revelations about Eragon's background in the previous book, Eldest, are given a new spin near the end, but the change is neither unexpected nor interesting. Predictably, the book concludes with even more character deaths and another battle, but those expecting a resolution will have to wait until the next novel. The cliched journey may appeal to younger readers of genre fiction. Older teens, even those who might have first cut their teeth on Paolini's writing years ago, are less likely to be impressed. Ages 12-up. (Sept.)

Reviewed by School Library Journal Reviews (SLJ Reviews 2003 September)
Gr 5 Up-Eragon, 15, is hunting for wild game when he witnesses a mysterious explosion. At the center of the blast radius he finds a polished blue stone marked with white veins. Brom, the village storyteller, has shown interest in it, so it is to him that Eragon turns when it starts squeaking, then wobbling, and then hatches into a majestic sapphire blue dragon. His decision to keep and raise Saphira starts him on an epic journey of Tolkienesque proportions that is only partially told in the 500 pages of this book. Eragon learns that the Empire's cruel and oppressive king will stop at nothing to get Eragon and Saphira to serve him. Training and traveling with Brom, the teen and dragon learn to work together in war and peace, using a combination of traditional fighting arts and magic. They encounter massive humanoid warriors with savage intentions and are befriended by Murtagh, a human warrior with mysterious ties to the Varden and the Empire. Eventually, they seek refuge with dwarves who harbor the Varden, who exist to free the Empire. Eragon does not approach the depth, uniqueness, or mastery of J. R. R. Tolkien's works, and sometimes the magic solutions are just too convenient for getting out of difficult situations. However, the empathetic characters and interesting plot twists will appeal to the legions of readers who have been captivated by the "Lord of the Rings" trilogy and are looking for more books like it.-Susan L. Rogers, Chestnut Hill Academy, PA Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.