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Going Bovine Reissue Edition
Contributor(s): Bray, Libba
ISBN: 0385733984     ISBN-13: 9780385733984
Publisher: Ember
    OUR PRICE: $13.19  
Product Type: Paperback - Other Formats
Published: September 2010
Qty:
Annotation: Can Cameron find what he’s looking for?

All 16-year-old Cameron wants is to get through high school—and life in general—with a minimum of effort. It’s not a lot to ask. But that’s before he’s given some bad news: he’s sick and he’s going to die. Which totally sucks. Hope arrives in the winged form of Dulcie, a loopy punk angel/possible hallucination with a bad sugar habit. She tells Cam there is a cure—if he’s willing to go in search of it. With the help of a death-obsessed, video-gaming dwarf and a yard gnome, Cam sets off on the mother of all road trips through a twisted America into the heart of what matters most.


From the Hardcover edition.
Additional Information
Library of Congress Subjects:
Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease; Fiction.
Mad cow disease; Fiction.
Dwarfs; Fiction.
Dewey: [Fic]
LCCN: 2008043774
Lexile Measure: 680
Academic/Grade Level: Grade 10-12, Age 15-18
Book type: Juvenile Fiction
Physical Information: 8.00" H x 5.25" W x 1.25" (0.85 lbs) 480 pages
Accelerated Reader Info
Quiz #: 133076
Reading Level: 4.0   Interest Level: Upper Grades   Point Value: 17.0
Scholastic Reading Counts Info
Quiz #: Q47954
Reading Level: 5.2   Interest Level: Grades 9-12   Point Value: 26.0
 
Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.

Contributor Bio(s): >Libba Bray is the author of the New York Times bestselling Gemma Doyle Trilogy. She lives in Brooklyn, New York. Visit her at www.libbabray.com.


From the Hardcover edition.

Reviewed by Horn Book Guide Reviews (Horn Book Guide Reviews 2010 Spring)
Sixteen-year-old Cameron, diagnosed with Creutzfeldt-Jakob (a.k.a. mad cow) disease, goes on a mission to save the world--or does he? Bray gleefully tosses a hallucinogenic mix of elements into the adventure. Their origins can be found in Cameron's pre-diagnosis life, begging the question: even if Cameron's experiences are a dream, are they any less real? Readers will enjoy trying to sort everything out. Copyright 2010 Horn Book Magazine Reviews.

Reviewed by Horn Book Magazine Reviews (Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2009 #5)
When sixteen-year-old Cameron was five, he jumped ship on the "It's a Small World" ride at Disney World and nearly drowned. "The thing is, before they pulled me out, everything had seemed made of magic...But the minute I came to on the hard, glittery, spray-painted, fake snow...I realized it was all a big fake. The realest thing I'd ever experienced was that moment under the water when I almost died." This sets the theme for the even wilder ride that follows, when Cameron's erratic behavior leads to a diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob (a.k.a. mad cow) disease. With the student body that used to ignore him throwing a save-Cameron pep rally and decorating the gym with paper cows, Cameron and his friend Gonzo, a hypochondriac dwarf, flee the hospital on a mission (as detailed by a punk-rock angel named Dulcie) to save the world from "dark energy" -- or do they? Bray gleefully tosses a hallucinogenic mix of elements into the adventure -- snow globes, fire demons, a talking yard gnome, a demon-fighting New Orleans jazz musician, and more -- but their origins can all be found in Cameron's mundane pre-diagnosis life. So is his trip "just a ride," as his Mom once told him about "It's a Small World"? Readers will have a great time trying to sort everything out and answer the question at the heart of it all: even if Cameron's experiences are all a dream, are they any less real? Copyright 2009 Horn Book Magazine Reviews.

Reviewed by Publishers Weekly Reviews (PW Reviews 2009 August #1)

Cameron Smith, 16, is slumming through high school, overshadowed by a sister "pre-majoring in perfection," while working (ineptly) at the Buddha Burger. Then something happens to make him the focus of his family's attention: he contracts mad cow disease. What takes place after he is hospitalized is either that a gorgeous angel persuades him to search for a cure that will also save the world, or that he has a vivid hallucination brought on by the disease. Either way, what readers have is an absurdist comedy in which Cameron, Gonzo (a neurotic dwarf) and Balder (a Norse god cursed to appear as a yard gnome) go on a quixotic road trip during which they learn about string theory, wormholes and true love en route to Disney World. Bray's surreal humor may surprise fans of her historical fantasies about Gemma Doyle, as she trains her satirical eye on modern education, American materialism and religious cults (the smoothie-drinking members of the Church of Everlasting Satisfaction and Snack 'N' Bowl). Offer this to fans of Douglas Adams's Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy seeking more inspired lunacy. Ages 14–up. (Sept.)

[Page 46]. Copyright 2009 Reed Business Information.

Reviewed by School Library Journal Reviews (SLJ Reviews 2009 September)

Gr 8 Up—In this ambitious novel, Cameron, a 16-year-old slacker whose somewhat dysfunctional family has just about given up on him, as perhaps he himself has, when his diagnosis of Creutzfeldt-Jacob, "mad cow" disease, reunites them, if too late. The heart of the story, though, is a hallucinatory—or is it?—quest with many parallels to the hopeless but inspirational efforts of Don Quixote, about whom Cameron had been reading before his illness. Just like the crazy—or was he?—Spaniard, Cam is motivated to go on a journey by a sort of Dulcinea. His pink-haired, white-winged version goes by Dulcie and leads him to take up arms against the Dark Wizard and fire giants that attack him intermittently, and to find a missing Dr. X, who can both help save the world and cure him. Cameron's Sancho is a Mexican-American dwarf, game-master hypochondriac he met in the pot smokers' bathroom at school who later turns up as his hospital roommate. Bray blends in a hearty dose of satire on the road trip as Cameron leaves his Texas deathbed—or does he?—to battle evil forces with a legendary jazz horn player, to escape the evil clutches of a happiness cult, to experiment with cloistered scientists trying to solve the mysteries of the universe, and to save a yard gnome embodying a Viking god from the clutches of the materialistic, fame-obsessed MTV-culture clones who shun individual thought. It's a trip worth taking, though meandering and message-driven at times. Some teens may check out before Cameron makes it to his final destination, but many will enjoy asking themselves the questions both deep and shallow that pop up along the way.—Suzanne Gordon, Peachtree Ridge High School, Suwanee, GA

[Page 151]. Copyright 2008 Reed Business Information.