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Rules
Contributor(s): Lord, Cynthia
ISBN: 0439443822     ISBN-13: 9780439443821
Publisher: Scholastic Pr
    OUR PRICE: $14.39  
Product Type: Hardcover - Other Formats
Published: April 2006
Qty:
Annotation: Twelve-year-old Catherine just wants a normal life. Which is near impossible when you have a brother with autism and a family that revolves around his disability. She's spent years trying to teach David the rules-from "a peach is not a funny-looking apple" to "keep your pants on in public"-in order to stop his embarrassing behaviors. But the summer Catherine meets Jason, a paraplegic boy, and Kristi, the next-door friend she's always wished for, it's her own shocking behavior that turns everything upside down and forces her to ask: What is normal?
Additional Information
Library of Congress Subjects:
Autism; Fiction.
Brothers and sisters; Fiction.
People with disabilities; Fiction.
BISAC Categories:
- Juvenile Fiction | Family | Siblings
- Juvenile Fiction | Social Issues | Special Needs
- Juvenile Fiction | Social Issues | Friendship
Dewey: [Fic]
LCCN: 2005017519
Lexile Measure: 780
Academic/Grade Level: Grade 4-6, Age 9-11
Series: Newbery Honor Book
Book type: Juvenile Fiction
Physical Information: 8.75" H x 6.00" W x 1.00" (0.75 lbs) 208 pages
Accelerated Reader Info
Quiz #: 106154
Reading Level: 3.9   Interest Level: Middle Grades   Point Value: 4.0
Scholastic Reading Counts Info
Quiz #: Q38897
Reading Level: 4.5   Interest Level: Grades 6-8   Point Value: 9.0
 
Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.

Contributor Bio(s):
Cynthia Lord is the award-winning author of Rules, a Newbery Honor Book and a Schneider Family Book Award winner, as well as the critically acclaimed Half a Chance and A Handful of Stars. She made her picture-book debut with Hot Rod Hamster, which won several awards, including the Parents' Choice Award, and is the author of the Shelter Pet Squad chapter book series. She lives in Maine with her family. Visit her at cynthialord.com.


Reviewed by Horn Book Guide Reviews (Horn Book Guide Reviews 2006 Fall)
Catherine is often embarrassed by her autistic brother and develops rules to help David act appropriately. When Jason, a non-verbal, wheelchair-using boy, asks her to a dance, she invokes her own rule against dancing. Jason uses his communication book to reply "RULE. Stupid. Excuse," and Catherine must face her fear of embarrassment. The emotions in this fast-paced novel ring true. Copyright 2006 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

Reviewed by Publishers Weekly Reviews (PW Reviews 2006 April #3)

The appealing, credible narrator at the heart of Lord's debut novel will draw in readers, as she struggles to find order and balance in her life. Her parents place 12-year-old Catherine in charge of her younger autistic brother more often than she would like. Taking solace in art, the girl fills the back of her sketchbook with rules she has established for David, "so if my someday-he'll-wake-up-a-regular-brother wish doesn't ever come true, at least he'll know how the world works, and I won't have to keep explaining things." Sorely missing her best friend, who is away for the summer, and realizing that the girl who has just moved in next door is not a kindred spirit, Catherine devises some of her own self-protective rules ("When you want to get out of answering something, distract the questioner with another question"). In the able hands of the author, mother of an autistic child, Catherine's emotions come across as entirely convincing, especially her alternating devotion to and resentment of David, and her guilt at her impatience with him. Through her artwork, the heroine gradually opens up to Jason, a wheelchair-bound peer who can communicate only by pointing to words on cards. As she creates new cards that expand Jason's ability to express his feelings, their growing friendship enables Catherine to do the same. A rewarding story that may well inspire readers to think about others' points of view. Ages 9-12. (Apr.)

[Page 188]. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Reviewed by School Library Journal Reviews (SLJ Reviews 2006 April)

Gr 4-7 -Twelve-year-old Catherine has conflicting feelings about her younger brother, David, who is autistic. While she loves him, she is also embarrassed by his behavior and feels neglected by their parents. In an effort to keep life on an even keel, Catherine creates rules for him ("It's okay to hug Mom but not the clerk at the video store"). Each chapter title is also a rule, and lots more are interspersed throughout the book. When Kristi moves in next door, Catherine hopes that the girl will become a friend, but is anxious about her reaction to David. Then Catherine meets and befriends Jason, a nonverbal paraplegic who uses a book of pictures to communicate, she begins to understand that normal is difficult, and perhaps unnecessary, to define. Rules of behavior are less important than acceptance of others. Catherine is an endearing narrator who tells her story with both humor and heartbreak. Her love for her brother is as real as are her frustrations with him. Lord has candidly captured the delicate dynamics in a family that revolves around a child's disability. Set in coastal Maine, this sensitive story is about being different, feeling different, and finding acceptance. A lovely, warm read, and a great discussion starter.-Connie Tyrrell Burns, Mahoney Middle School, South Portland, ME

[Page 142]. Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.