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Red Glass Reprint Edition
Contributor(s): Resau, Laura
ISBN: 0440240255     ISBN-13: 9780440240259
Publisher: Delacorte Pr
    OUR PRICE: $8.09  
Product Type: Paperback - Other Formats
Published: May 2009
Qty:
Annotation: ★ ""A captivating read."--"School Library Journal," Starred"
One night Sophie and her parents are called to a hospital where Pedro, a six-year-old Mexican boy, is recovering from dehydration. Crossing the border into Arizona with a group of Mexicans and a coyote, or guide, Pedro and his parents faced such harsh conditions that the boy is the only survivor. Pedro comes to live with Sophie, her parents, and Sophie's Aunt Dika, a refugee of the war in Bosnia. Sophie loves Pedro--her "Principito, "or Little Prince. But after a year, Pedro's surviving family in Mexico makes contact, and Sophie, Dika, Dika's new boyfriend, and his son must travel with Pedro to his hometown so that he can make a heartwrenching decision.
"An IRA Award Winner
An Americas Award Honor Book
An ALA-YALSA Best Book for Young Adults
A Colorado Book Award Winner
A Cybil Award Finalist
A "School Library Journal "Best Book
A Richie's Pick"
Additional Information
Library of Congress Subjects:
Self-confidence; Fiction.
Automobile travel; Fiction.
Orphans; Fiction.
Dewey: [Fic]
LCCN: bl2009013109
Lexile Measure: 800
Academic/Grade Level: Grade 7-9, Age 12-14
Book type: Juvenile Fiction
Physical Information: 8.50" H x 5.50" W x 0.75" (0.50 lbs) 275 pages
Accelerated Reader Info
Quiz #: 117896
Reading Level: 4.9   Interest Level: Upper Grades   Point Value: 10.0
Scholastic Reading Counts Info
Quiz #: Q42208
Reading Level: 5.3   Interest Level: Grades 6-8   Point Value: 17.0
 
Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.
Publisher Description:
ONE NIGHT SOPHIE and her parents are called to a hospital where Pedro, 6-year-old Mexican boy, is recovering from dehydration. Crossing the border into Arizona with a group of Mexicans and a coyote, or guide, Pedro and his parents faced such harsh conditions that the boy is the only survivor. Pedro comes to live with Sophie, her parents, and Sophie's Aunt Dika, a refugee of the war in Bosnia. Sophie loves Pedro - her Principito, or Little Prince. But after a year, Pedro's surviving family in Mexico makes contact, and Sophie, Dika, Dika's new boyfriend, and his son must travel with Pedro to his hometown so that he can make a heartwrenching decision.

"From the Hardcover edition."


Contributor Bio(s): ura Resau lived in the Mixtec region of Oaxaca, Mexico, for two years as an English teacher and anthropologist. She now lives with her husband and her dog in Colorado.


From the Hardcover edition.

Reviewed by Horn Book Guide Reviews (Horn Book Guide Reviews 2008 Spring)
After Border Patrol leaves six-year-old Pablo at her home, sixteen-year-old Sophie and her aunt take Pablo to rural Mexico to visit his extended family. The trip invites shy Sophie to find courage and revel in simple pleasures. Resau excels in gently explicating profound and fragile emotions. The novel is an unconventional portrait of love, built on determination and perseverance. Copyright 2008 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

Reviewed by Horn Book Magazine Reviews (Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2008 #1)
Resau's (What the Moon Saw) second novel is a delicately wrought exploration of tragedy, violence, and the human ability to sustain love. Painfully shy and plagued by fear, sixteen-year-old Sophie is oblivious to her own beauty and potential. Her family is a surprising collection of survivors -- her stepfather, a legalized Mexican immigrant; her aunt, a Bosnian war refugee; and her mother, who holds them all together. When the Border Patrol brings six-year-old Pablo, the lone survivor of an ill-fated border crossing, to her home to recuperate, Sophie longs to make him part of the family. Reluctantly (she doesn't want to risk losing Pablo), Sophie agrees to accompany her aunt and a father-and-son pair of Guatemalan war refugees on a trip to rural Mexico so Pablo can visit his extended family. The trip forces Sophie to draw on her deepest reserves of courage, but it also invites her to revel in simple pleasures. Resau excels in gently explicating profound and fragile emotions. She holds taut in scene after scene the battle Sophie wages to be safe from loss and yet to love those who might hurt her by leaving. The novel may end in a conventional wedding, but it is nevertheless an unconventional portrait of love, built not on soft sentiments but on hard-won survival and a determination to persevere. Copyright 2008 Horn Book Magazine Reviews.

Reviewed by Publishers Weekly Reviews (PW Reviews 2007 October #1)

Suffused with the region's vibrant colors, Resau's (What the Moon Saw ) memorable novel deftly blends Latin America's richness and mystery with the brutal realities its emigrants carry away. In her Arizona border town, narrator Sophie looks on as "a woman in a dress gazed at our muddy pond, a shallow puddle of sludge and leaves that shone in the moonlight. She knelt down as though she were praying, bowed her head, and drank, cupping the dirty water to her lips." The prose captivates from the first chapter, where a six-year-old Mexican boy, orphaned during an illegal border crossing, enters Sophie's family on her 16th birthday, inviting comparisons with her favorite fictional character, the Little Prince (Saint-Exupry's story serves as a subtext throughout). Like him, vulnerable Pablo yearns to go home. Sophie, bound by long-held fears, emerges from her tight shell as she helps escorts him to Mexico and continues on to Guatemala to help her new love interest, a teenage survivor of Guatemala's civil war, resurrect a painful past. Central themes of fear and emotional survival permeate the multilayered plot; Resau focuses on Sophie's increasing willingness to cross physical, social and emotional borders, but most of her other characters have also faced major dislocations, from Sophie's British-born mother to the distantly related Dika, a middle-aged Bosnian refugee. A mystical overlay from the practices of Pablo's Mixtec relatives adds even more luster to a vibrant, large-hearted story. Ages 10-up. (Sept.)

[Page 58]. Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information.

Reviewed by School Library Journal Reviews (SLJ Reviews 2007 October)

Gr 8 Up— Timid and fearful, 16-year-old Sophie finds courage and first love when she and her Bosnian great-aunt Dika join a Guatemalan immigrant and his son to take six-year-old Pablo, sole survivor of his family's illegal trek into the U.S., back to his Mexican relatives. Arizona-born Sophie's allergies and fears are tellingly contrasted with the real experiences of Dika, ngel, and Mr. Lorenzo, survivors of wartime violence in their own countries. The author's love for the culture and physical setting of rural Oaxaca and northern Guatemala is shown in beautiful, descriptive detail. Rich, poetic language, elements of the hero quest story pattern, and quotations from St. Exupry's The Little Prince are braided through this coming-of-age romance as Sophie grows from amorphous onlooker into a strong, risk-taking young woman. Secondary characters, especially the 60-year-old Dika and her "boyfriend," Mr. Lorenzo, are well developed. Readers will sympathize with Pablo and agonize as he chooses whether to stay in Mexico or return to Sophie's family in Arizona. The satisfying love stories and moving glimpse of the immigrant experience make this a captivating read.—Kathleen Isaacs, Towson University, MD

[Page 162]. Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information.