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Arrowsmith Reprint Edition
Contributor(s): Lewis, Sinclair, Doctorow, E. L. (Afterword), Parry, Sally E. (Introduction by)
ISBN: 0451530861     ISBN-13: 9780451530868
Publisher: Signet Classic
    OUR PRICE: $7.16  
Product Type: Paperback - Other Formats
Published: March 2008
Qty:
Annotation: The Pulitzer Prize winning "Arrowsmith" (an award Lewis refused to accept) recounts the story of a doctor who is forced to give up his trade for reasons ranging from public ignorance to the publicity-mindedness of a great foundation, and becomes an isolated seeker of scientific truth. Introduction by E.L. Doctorow.
Additional Information
Library of Congress Subjects:
Physicians; Fiction.
Medicine; Practice; Fiction.
Medicine; Research; Fiction.
BISAC Categories:
- Fiction | Classics
Dewey: 813/.52
LCCN: 2008540291
Academic/Grade Level: General Adult
Book type: Fiction
Physical Information: 4.00" H x 7.00" W x 1.25" (0.25 lbs) 459 pages
Accelerated Reader Info
Quiz #: 6640
Reading Level: 9.5   Interest Level: Upper Grades   Point Value: 29.0
 
Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.
Publisher Description:
1925. Illustrated with scenes from the Samuel Goldwyn Production, a United Artists Picture. Possibly the greatest satirist of his age, Lewis wrote novels that present a devastating picture of middle-class American life in the 1920s. Although he ridiculed the values, the lifestyles, and even the speech of his characters, there is often affection behind the irony. Sinclair's most praised novel and the one that won him the Pulitzer Prize (which he refused) Arrowsmith tells the tale of Martin Arrowsmith fulfills a lifelong dream of becoming a physician with a passion for research. Combating the forces of ignorance and greed, he relentlessly pursues scientific truth, even in the face of his own personal tragedy. See other titles by this author available from Kessinger Publishing.

Contributor Bio(s): Harry Sinclair Lewis (1885–1951) was born in Sauk Centre, Minnesota, the son of a country doctor. After graduating from Yale in 1907, he went to New York, tried freelance work for a time, and then worked in a variety of editorial positions from the East Coast to California. Main Street (1920) was his first successful novel. In the decade that followed, Lewis published four other acclaimed novels of social criticism—Babbitt (1922), Arrowsmith (1925), Elmer Gantry (1927), and Dodsworth (1929). In 1930 he became the first American to win the Nobel Prize for literature. He continued to write both novels and plays for another two decades, publishing his last work, World So Wide (1951), shortly before his death in Rome.

Sally E. Parry is Associate Dean, College of Arts and Sciences, and Director of General Education at Illinois State University. She is currently the Executive Director of the Sinclair Lewis Society and editor of the Sinclair Lewis Society Newsletter. She has edited two collections of short stories by Sinclair Lewis, Go East, Young Man: Sinclair Lewis on Class in America (2005) and The Minnesota Stories of Sinclair Lewis (2005), and with Robert L. McLaughlin, written We’ll Always Have the Movies: American Cinema During World War II (2006). 

E. L. Doctorow is one of America’s preeminent men of letters. His novels include The Waterworks, Ragtime, The Book of Daniel, Loon Lake, World’s Fair, Lives of the Poets, Billy Bathgate, and Welcome to Hard Times. His work has garnered the National Book Critics Circle Award twice, the National Book Award, the PEN/Faulkner Award, the Edith Wharton Citation for Fiction, and the William Dean Howells medal of the American Academy of Arts and Letters.Sinclair Lewis was born in 1885 in Sauk Centre, Minnesota, and graduated from Yale University in 1908. His college career was interrupted by various part-time occupations, including a period working at the Helicon Home Colony, Upton Sinclair’s socialist experiment in New Jersey. He worked for some years as a free lance editor and journalist, during which time he published several minor novels. But with the publication ofMain Street (1920), which sold half a million copies, he achieved wide recognition. This was followed by the two novels considered by many to be his finest,Babbitt (1922) and Arrowsmith (1925), which was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1926, but declined by Lewis. In 1930, followingElmer Gantry (1927) and Dodsworth (1929), Sinclair Lewis became the first American author to be awarded the Nobel Prize for distinction in world literature. This was the apogee of his literary career, and in the period fromAnn Vickers (1933) to the posthumously published World So Wide (1951) Lewis wrote ten novels that reveal the progressive decline of his creative powers.From Main Street to Stockholm, a collection of his letters, was published in 1952, andThe Man from Main Street, a collection of essays, in 1953. During his last years Sinclair Lewis wandered extensively in Europe, and after his death in Rome in 1951 his ashes were returned to his birthplace.