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I woke up dead at the mall
Contributor(s): Sheehan, Judy
ISBN: 0553512463     ISBN-13: 9780553512465
Publisher: Delacorte Pr
    OUR PRICE: $17.81  
Product Type: Hardcover - Other Formats
Published: March 2016
Qty:
Annotation: Waking up as a ghost at the Mall of America to discover that she has been murdered and her killer is still on the loose, Sarah receives guidance from her death coach so that she can try to resolve unfinished business or risk a permanent existence trapped in the mall. Simultaneous eBook.
Additional Information
Library of Congress Subjects:
Dead; Fiction.
Murder; Fiction.
Mystery and detective stories.
Dewey: [Fic]
LCCN: 2014044042
Lexile Measure: 490
Academic/Grade Level: Grade 7-9, Age 12-14
Book type: Juvenile Fiction
Physical Information: 8.75" H x 6.00" W x 1.00" (0.86 lbs) 278 pages
 
Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.

Reviewed by Horn Book Guide Reviews (Horn Book Guide Reviews 2016 Fall)
Sixteen-year-old Sarah and several other teenage murder victims experience their afterlife in the Mall of America. While the others focus on letting go of their lives on earth, Sarah investigates her death and tries to keep her killer from striking again. Fans of tearjerkers and supernatural love stories alike will fall hard for this mystery-slash-romance-slash-ghost story. Copyright 2016 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

Reviewed by School Library Journal Reviews (SLJ Reviews 2016 February)

Gr 9 Up—Sixteen-year-old New Yorker Sarah Evans is shocked when she wakes up dead. At the Mall of America. In Minnesota. Wearing the mango chiffon bridesmaid gown she had on when she died. Along with fellow teen murder victims Harry (cancer, although that isn't technically what killed him), Lacey (pushed off a roof), Alice (she doesn't want to talk about it), and the oh-so-dreamy Nick (gunshot to the chest), Sarah is supposed to use her time at the mall to prepare to move on. The only problem is that Sarah can't believe anyone would want to murder her when she spent her entire (short) life determined to be ordinary. Sarah also knows without a doubt that her father is in danger and she's the only one who can save him—even if interfering with the living is against the rules, according to her annoyingly chipper "death coach," Bertha. In this humorous and offbeat ghost story, Sarah uses her uncanny haunting abilities, along with some help from her new friends, to make sense of her afterlife and save the day. Sarah's snark-filled first-person narration meshes well with the madcap quality of this story. This novel sidesteps religion by presenting the Boy (aka "Boss of You") as the ultimate authority figure in the afterlife while also keeping things like angels separate from any faith-based interpretations. Unfortunately these seemingly arbitrary alternatives also provide little in the way of world-building for the fantasy elements. Pop culture references, including a years too late cameo by Oprah Winfrey, lend a dated and out-of-touch quality to this otherwise strong plot. One-note characters with vague motivations further diminish the overall impact of this novel. VERDICT Sheehan's quirky vision of the afterlife ultimately leads to a meandering plot with a mixed bag of plot points and an ending that ties things up with a too neat bow.—Emma Carbone, Brooklyn Public Library

[Page 104]. (c) Copyright 2016 Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Reviewed by School Library Journal Reviews (SLJ Reviews 2016 March)

Gr 9 Up—Sixteen-year-old New Yorker Sarah Evans is shocked when she wakes up dead. At the Mall of America. In Minnesota. Wearing the mango chiffon bridesmaid gown she had on when she died. Along with fellow teen murder victims Harry (cancer, although that isn't technically what killed him), Lacey (pushed off a roof), Alice (she doesn't want to talk about it), and the oh-so-dreamy Nick (gunshot to the chest), Sarah is supposed to use her time at the mall to prepare to move on. The only problem is that Sarah can't believe anyone would want to murder her when she spent her entire (short) life determined to be ordinary. Sarah also knows without a doubt that her father is in danger and she's the only one who can save him—even if interfering with the living is against the rules, according to her annoyingly chipper "death coach," Bertha. In this humorous and offbeat ghost story, Sarah uses her uncanny haunting abilities, along with some help from her new friends, to make sense of her afterlife and save the day. Sarah's snark-filled first-person narration meshes well with the madcap quality of this story. This novel sidesteps religion by presenting the Boy (aka "Boss of You") as the ultimate authority figure in the afterlife while also keeping things like angels separate from any faith-based interpretations. Unfortunately these seemingly arbitrary alternatives also provide little in the way of world-building for the fantasy elements. Pop culture references, including a years too late cameo by Oprah Winfrey, lend a dated and out-of-touch quality to this otherwise strong plot. One-note characters with vague motivations further diminish the overall impact of this novel. VERDICT Sheehan's quirky vision of the afterlife ultimately leads to a meandering plot with a mixed bag of plot points and an ending that ties things up with a too neat bow.—Emma Carbone, Brooklyn Public Library

[Page 104]. (c) Copyright 2016 Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.