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Afrika Reprint Edition
Contributor(s): Craig, Colleen (Author)
ISBN: 1442000880     ISBN-13: 9781442000889
Publisher: Follettbound
    OUR PRICE: $18.95  
Product Type: Prebind - Other Formats
Published: July 2009
* Not available - Not in print at this time *Annotation: Traveling to South Africa with her journalist mother, thirteen-year-old Kim explores the country's diverse and often shocking history, while trying to unlock the secret that has always kept her from knowing her father.
Additional Information
Library of Congress Subjects:
Apartheid;Fiction.
South Africa;History;Fiction.
Apartheid;Fiction.
Dewey: FIC
LCCN: bl2008032831
Academic/Grade Level: Grade 7-9, Age 12-14
Book type: Juvenile Fiction
Physical Information: .75000" H x 5.25000" W x 7.75000" (.72000 lbs) 233 pages
Scholastic Reading Counts Info
Quiz #: Q44372
Reading Level: 4.3   Interest Level: Grades 6-8   Point Value: 14.0
 
Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.

Contributor Bio(s): Born and raised in western Canada, Colleen Craig studied creative writing at the University of British Columbia. She then lived in South Africa during the 1980s and observed apartheid firsthand. In 1991 she moved back to Canada and settled in Toronto where she continued her career as a playwright. In 1997 she became a Stott Pilates teacher and in 2001 began to publish the bestselling Pilates on the Ball series which has been translated into six languages. Afrika is her first novel.Born and raised in western Canada, Colleen Craig studied creative writing at the University of British Columbia. She then lived in South Africa during the 1980s and observed apartheid firsthand. In 1991 she moved back to Canada and settled in Toronto where she continued her career as a playwright. In 1997 she became a Stott Pilates teacher and in 2001 began to publish the bestsellingPilates on the Ball series which has been translated into six languages. Afrika is her first novel.

Reviewed by School Library Journal Reviews (SLJ Reviews 2008 July)

Gr 6–8— Growing up in Canada with her white South African mother, Kim van der Merwe does not know who her father is. Now, at 13, she goes to Cape Town for the first time, shortly after independence in the mid-1990s, because her mother, a journalist, is going to report on the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Visiting and meeting her family for the first time, she decides that her mission will be to discover her father's identity. When Kim becomes involved in a friendship with the family who works for the van der Merwes', especially Themba, whose father was murdered by the police during apartheid, her life becomes more closely entwined with South Africa's political and social realities. As she gets closer to the answer she seeks, her mother becomes more and more unhinged by the horrors she hears about in her work. The climax packs a powerful emotional punch as the author dovetails Kim's personal odyssey with the pain, contradictions, and hopes of the country as it carries its devastating history into the future. The realities of the society are carefully and skillfully portrayed, so that Kim's story is truly the emotional heart of the book, and not a vehicle for ideas. Kim herself is a believable and likable character, and her relationship with Themba is tender and realistic. The author does not sugarcoat the realities of South Africa, or the details of torture that are revealed at the Truth Commission. Not just another multicultural title, by any means, this novel will really grab readers who appreciate realistic fiction about young people searching for their place in the world.—Sue Giffard, Ethical Culture Fieldston School, New York City

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