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Steve Jobs: A Biography
Contributor(s): Isaacson, Walter
ISBN: 1451648537     ISBN-13: 9781451648539
Publisher: Simon & Schuster
    OUR PRICE: $31.50  
Product Type: Hardcover - Other Formats
Published: October 2011
Qty:
Annotation: Draws on more than forty interviews with Steve Jobs, as well as interviews with family members, friends, competitors, and colleagues to offer a look at the co-founder and leading creative force behind the Apple computer company.
Additional Information
Library of Congress Subjects:
Computer engineers; United States; Biography.
Businesspeople; United States; Biography.
BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY / Business.; bisacsh
BISAC Categories:
- Biography & Autobiography | Business
- Business & Economics | Industries | Computer Industry
- Technology & Engineering
Dewey: 621.39092
LCCN: 2011045006
Lexile Measure: 1080
Academic/Grade Level: General Adult
Book type: Non-Fiction
Physical Information: 9.50" H x 6.50" W x 1.75" (2.20 lbs) 630 pages
Accelerated Reader Info
Quiz #: 148854
Reading Level: 8.6   Interest Level: Upper Grades   Point Value: 40.0
Scholastic Reading Counts Info
Quiz #: Q57465
Reading Level: 10.2   Interest Level: Grades 9-12   Point Value: 45.0
 
Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.

Contributor Bio(s): lter Isaacson, the CEO of the Aspen Institute, has been chairman of CNN and the managing editor of Time magazine. He is the author of Einstein: His Life and Universe; Benjamin Franklin: An American Life; and Kissinger: A Biography, and the coauthor of The Wise Men: Six Friends and the World They Made. He lives in Washington, D.C., with his wife and daughter.

Reviewed by Publishers Weekly Reviews (PW Reviews 2011 December #3)

If not the greatest of computer moguls, the late Apple Computer co-founder was certainly the most colorful and charismatic to judge by this compelling biography. Journalist Isaacson (Albert Einstein) had his subject's intimate cooperation but doesn't shy away from Jobs's off-putting traits: the egomania; the shameless theft of ideas; the "reality distortion field" of lies and delusions; the veering between manipulative charm and cold betrayal; the bullying rages, profanity and weeping; the bizarre vegetarian diets that he believed would ward off body odor and cancer (he was tragically wrong on both counts). Isaacson also sees the constructive flip-side of Jobs's flaws, arguing that his crazed perfectionism and sublime sense of design—he wanted even his computers' circuit boards to be visually elegant—begat brilliant innovations, from the Mac to the iPad, that blended "poetry and processors." The author oversells Jobs as the digital artiste pitting well-crafted, vertically integrated personal computing experiences against the promiscuously licensed, bulk-commodity software profferred by his Microsoft rival Bill Gates. (Gates's acerbic commentary on Jobs's romanticism often steals the page.) Still, Isaacson's exhaustively researched but well-paced, candid and gripping narrative gives us a great warts-and-all portrait of an entrepreneurial spirit—and one of the best accounts yet of the human side of the computer biz. Photos. (Oct. 24)

[Page ]. Copyright 2011 PWxyz LLC

Reviewed by PW Annex Reviews (Publishers Weekly Annex Reviews)

If not the greatest of computer moguls, the late Apple Computer co-founder was certainly the most colorful and charismatic to judge by this compelling biography. Journalist Isaacson (Albert Einstein) had his subject's intimate cooperation but doesn't shy away from Jobs's off-putting traits: the egomania; the shameless theft of ideas; the "reality distortion field" of lies and delusions; the veering between manipulative charm and cold betrayal; the bullying rages, profanity and weeping; the bizarre vegetarian diets that he believed would ward off body odor and cancer (he was tragically wrong on both counts). Isaacson also sees the constructive flip-side of Jobs's flaws, arguing that his crazed perfectionism and sublime sense of design—he wanted even his computers' circuit boards to be visually elegant—begat brilliant innovations, from the Mac to the iPad, that blended "poetry and processors." The author oversells Jobs as the digital artiste pitting well-crafted, vertically integrated personal computing experiences against the promiscuously licensed, bulk-commodity software profferred by his Microsoft rival Bill Gates. (Gates's acerbic commentary on Jobs's romanticism often steals the page.) Still, Isaacson's exhaustively researched but well-paced, candid and gripping narrative gives us a great warts-and-all portrait of an entrepreneurial spirit—and one of the best accounts yet of the human side of the computer biz. Photos. (Oct. 24)

[Page ]. Copyright 2011 PWxyz LLC