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Piecing Me Together
Contributor(s): Watson, Renée
ISBN: 1681191059     ISBN-13: 9781681191058
Publisher: Bloomsbury Childrens Books
    OUR PRICE: $16.19  
Product Type: Hardcover
Published: February 2017
Qty:
Annotation: Tired of being singled out at her mostly-white private school as someone who needs support, high school junior Jade would rather participate in the school's amazing Study Abroad program than join Women to Women, a mentorship program for at-risk girls.
Additional Information
Library of Congress Subjects:
Mentoring; Fiction.
High schools; Fiction.
Schools; Fiction.
Dewey: [Fic]
LCCN: 2016023127
Academic/Grade Level: Grade 7-9, Age 12-14
Book type: Juvenile Fiction
Physical Information: 8.50" H x 5.75" W x 1.00" (0.85 lbs) 264 pages
Accelerated Reader Info
Quiz #: 187729
Reading Level: 4.5   Interest Level: Upper Grades   Point Value: 7.0
Scholastic Reading Counts Info
Quiz #: Q70165
Reading Level: 4.2   Interest Level: Grades 9-12   Point Value: 14.0
 
Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.

Contributor Bio(s):

RENÉE WATSON is the New York Times bestselling, Newbery Honor and Coretta Scott King Author Award-winning author of the novels Watch Us Rise (co-written with Ellen Hagan), Piecing Me Together, This Side of Home, What Momma Left Me, Betty Before X, co-written with Ilyasah Shabazz, and two picture books: Harlem's Little Blackbird and A Place Where Hurricanes Happen. Renée is the founder of I, Too, Arts Collective, a nonprofit committed to nurturing underrepresented voices in the creative arts. She lives in New York City.
www.reneewatson.net
@harlemportland (Instagram)



Reviewed by Horn Book Guide Reviews (Horn Book Guide Reviews 2017 Fall)
African American teen Jade doesn't particularly feel at-risk, but at her mother's prodding she takes every opportunity offered to her, including joining a mentoring group with a clueless, careless mentor. Watson takes Jade on her own journey of self-discovery, one that readers will eagerly follow. This involving, thought-provoking novel is a multifaceted and clear-eyed exploration of the intersections of race, class, and gender. Copyright 2017 Horn Book Guide Reviews.

Reviewed by Horn Book Magazine Reviews (Horn Book Magazine Reviews 2017 #4)
At her mother's prodding, Jade has spent her high school career preparing herself for success. That has included taking every opportunity offered to her: a scholarship to the prestigious (and mostly white; Jade is African American) St. Francis High School. SAT prep classes. Essay-writing classes. While Jade has accepted every offer, she wonders who benefits more--she herself, or the people who get to boast that they've helped an "at-risk" girl from a "bad" neighborhood. While she does have financial and social issues to contend with at home, Jade is also fluent in Spanish and a talented artist; she doesn't particularly feel at-risk. When her guidance counselor suggests a "Woman to Woman" mentoring group, Jade is hopeful that her mentor will take the time to get to know her. But Maxine proves to be as clueless as the rest of them--when she even bothers to pay attention or show up. With no one willing to ask the questions to discover who she truly is, Jade realizes she will have to take the initiative and introduce herself to the world--and, in turn, create her own opportunities. Just as Jade is engrossed in her history-class study of York, the slave who accompanied Lewis and Clark, Watson (This Side of Home) takes Jade on her own journey of self-discovery, one that readers will avidly follow. With each chapter preceded by a Spanish word or phrase, this involving, thought-provoking novel is a multifaceted and clear-eyed exploration into the intersections of race, class, and gender. eboni njoku Copyright 2017 Horn Book Magazine Reviews.

Reviewed by Publishers Weekly Reviews (PW Reviews 2016 November #3)
Jade Butler, an African-American artist-in-the-making, lives with her mother in Portland, Ore., and travels by bus to private school, where she is both grateful for and resentful of the opportunities presented to her. In short, poetic chapters, Jade ponders her family, school, and neighborhood relationships, wondering where she fits in: "How I am someone's answered prayer but also someone's deferred dream." Watson (This Side of Home) weaves collage imagery throughout the story as Jade ruminates over historical figures such as York, the slave who traveled with Lewis and Clark, and distressing current events, including police violence against a neighborhood girl: "I am ripping and cutting. Gluing and pasting. Rearranging reality, redefining, covering, disguising. Tonight I am taking ugly and making beautiful." Jade's narrative voice offers compelling reflections on the complexities of race and gender, class and privilege, and fear and courage, while conveying the conflicted emotions of an ambitious, loyal girl. Teeming with compassion and insight, Watson's story trumpets the power of artistic expression to re-envision and change the world. Ages 12–up. Agent: Rosemary Stimola, Stimola Literary Studio. (Feb.) Copyright 2016 Publisher Weekly.

Reviewed by School Library Journal Reviews (SLJ Reviews 2017 January)

Gr 7 Up—High school junior Jade is an "at-risk" student from a rough neighborhood in Portland, OR. She is also a talented collage artist, and she attends an elite private school on scholarship. More than anything, she wants to go on a study abroad week offered at her school to use her Spanish skills. Instead, she is given an invitation to join Woman to Woman, a mentorship program for young women like her: poor and black. Her mentor, Maxine, is from a more privileged background, and Jade doesn't see what she can learn from her. But in spite of her early resistance to Maxine, Jade begins to open up and gain confidence, and, eventually, she is able to express the importance of her family, her community, and her art. The two strong female characters and the ways in which they struggle with and support each other form the center of this tale. Most young people will relate to Jade's search to find her voice and learn to advocate for herself in appropriate ways. The lack of a romantic lead may leave some young teen readers disappointed, but there is a real, refreshing strength in a fully fleshed-out female character whose story is her own. This is a memorable novel that demonstrates that a happy ending doesn't require a romantic subplot. VERDICT This unique and thought-provoking title offers a nuanced meditation on race, privilege, and intersectionality. A first purchase for YA collections.—Kristin Anderson, Columbus Metropolitan Library System, OH

Copyright 2016 School Library Journal.