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Don't Call Me Goon: Hockey's Greatest Enforcers, Gunslingers, and Bad Boys
Contributor(s): Oliver, Greg, Kamchen, Richard
ISBN: 1770410384     ISBN-13: 9781770410381
Publisher: Ecw Pr
    OUR PRICE: $17.96  
Product Type: Paperback - Other Formats
Published: September 2013
Qty:
Annotation:

In professional hockey, enforcers are often as popular with fans as the stars who cash the big paycheques. Called upon to duke it out with a fellow troublemaker, or to shadow (and bruise) an opponent’s top scorer, these men get the crowds out of their seats, the sports-radio shows buzzing, and the TV audience spilling their beers in excitement. Don’t Call Me Goon gives the mayhem-makers their due by sharing their overlooked stories and contributions to the game. Drawing on a wealth of knowledge, research, and interviews, Oliver and Kamchen highlight the players who have perfected the art of on-ice enforcing from old timers like Joe Hall and Red Horner; to legendary heavy-hitters like Tiger Williams, Stu Grimson, and Bob Probert; to fan favourites like Tie Domi and Georges Laraque; and contemporaries like Arron Asham and Brian McGrattan. Don’t Call Me Goon also explores the issues that plague the NHL’s bad boys — suspensions, concussions, controversy — and looks ahead to the future of tough guys in the fastest game on ice.


Additional Information
Library of Congress Subjects:
Hockey players; Attitudes.
Violence in sports.
BISAC Categories:
- Sports & Recreation | Hockey
- Biography & Autobiography | Sports
Dewey: 796.962/64
LCCN: oc2013120785
Academic/Grade Level: General Adult
Book type: Non-Fiction
Physical Information: 8.75" H x 6.00" W x 0.75" (1.05 lbs) 280 pages
 
Descriptions, Reviews, Etc.

Contributor Bio(s):

Greg Oliver is the author of Pro Wrestling Hall of Fame: Heroes and Icons, Pro Wrestling Hall of Fame: Tag Teams, and Pro Wrestling Hall of Fame: The Heels. He lives in Toronto. Richard Kamchen is a freelance writer living in Winnipeg, Manitoba.


Reviewed by Publishers Weekly Reviews (PW Reviews 2013 October #4)

Authors Kamchen and Oliver have provided a rambling encyclopedia of the NHL's oft-demonized enforcers. While ‘enforcer' is not an official position, every NHL team has at least one player whose primary role is to protect his most skilled teammates, intimidate other teams' players, and battle his opposite numbers. The ability to skate, defend, or score comes a distant second. In our age of heightened awareness of head trauma, the NHL is paying increased attention to player safety, but fights, and enforcers, still bring fans to the games. Enforcers distinguish North American hockey from European iterations of the game, and a historical overview of the evolution and shifting requirements of the job would be fascinating; however, Kamchen and Oliver don't provide one. Instead, they breeze from one mini-bio to the next and as a result, the names blur together. The enforcer story follows a template: player enters minor leagues. Player can fight. Player gets scouted because he can fight. Player earns a high-paying, violent job. Despite the sameness of this approach, the authors serve up plenty of fascinating anecdotes and remind us that, despite their savage pedigrees, there's more to these men than the armored warriors we see brutalizing each other on the ice. (Sept.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2013 PWxyz LLC

Reviewed by PW Annex Reviews (Publishers Weekly Annex Reviews)

Authors Kamchen and Oliver have provided a rambling encyclopedia of the NHL's oft-demonized enforcers. While ‘enforcer' is not an official position, every NHL team has at least one player whose primary role is to protect his most skilled teammates, intimidate other teams' players, and battle his opposite numbers. The ability to skate, defend, or score comes a distant second. In our age of heightened awareness of head trauma, the NHL is paying increased attention to player safety, but fights, and enforcers, still bring fans to the games. Enforcers distinguish North American hockey from European iterations of the game, and a historical overview of the evolution and shifting requirements of the job would be fascinating; however, Kamchen and Oliver don't provide one. Instead, they breeze from one mini-bio to the next and as a result, the names blur together. The enforcer story follows a template: player enters minor leagues. Player can fight. Player gets scouted because he can fight. Player earns a high-paying, violent job. Despite the sameness of this approach, the authors serve up plenty of fascinating anecdotes and remind us that, despite their savage pedigrees, there's more to these men than the armored warriors we see brutalizing each other on the ice. (Sept.)

[Page ]. Copyright 2013 PWxyz LLC